Pre-order Food Lover’s Guide to Portland Tique Box

December 5th, 2014

Food Lover's Guide to Portland TIQUE BOX! Available for pre-order!

I had so much fun putting together this Food Lover’s Guide to Portland Tique Box with Tique founders Inger McDowell and Paige Buckner when they reached out to me several weeks ago. The mission of their business is very similar to the mission of my book — celebrate talented and passionate local artisans, oftentimes lesser known ones.

There are all sorts of fantastic Portland foods/drinks/crafts/art that these ladies have put together into pretty boxes for subscriptions (I have a year-long subscription and just got my first box!) or for individual purchase. For my Food Lover’s Guide to Portland box I wanted to include treats made by folks who I love and admire that just about anyone will use and enjoy (in other words — accessible) which is why I included easy to love salt, hot sauce, peanut butter, honey, chocolate, candy and cheese. That said, these are all elevated, unique and, of course, delicious renditions of these classics. Go Portland!

This box makes a fantastic gift for locals and folks afar and you can pre-order it now for $45 here to ship by Priority Mail on Dec. 15th — just in time for the holidays. Here’s what you get:

So many tasty treats in this Tique Box!

Meeting of the minds -- Paige (left) and Inger at our initial Food Lover's PDX Tique Box meeting at Breken Kitchen.

Inger (left) and Paige with their Tique Boxes.

My November Tique Box -- delivered to my doorstep! Love it.

Purchase the Food Lover’s Guide to Portland Tique Box at
www.tiquebox.com
$45, ships via Priority Mail on Dec. 15th

MoonBrine Pickles

August 29th, 2011

Spicy MoonBrine Pickles really made this ham sandwich. Freaky good.

I’m kind a pickle freak although I’m particular. I’m not so into bread & butter or other sweet pickles. I like the salty, sour and spicy pickles the best — namely fresh garlic, spicy, dills and crock-fermented dills. Just made some of the former, in fact, and can see them on the kitchen counter from where I’m typing at the kitchen table — my studio is too hot today.

Anyway, a few weeks ago I came home to a lovely package on my front porch — two tasty jars of MoonBrine Pickles courtesy of the pickler himself — Stew Golomb — a former elementary school teacher from Boston who moved to Portland a little more than a year ago. Thanks Stew!

I love them. We’ve eaten most of them as is but have added some to sandwiches too. They’re tasty fermented pickles with a little vinegar added for good measure. By the way, some of my favorite local pickles are Picklopolis Pickles. Picklopolis’ Mr. Briney Barber is a very good friend of mine so I don’t want to let a pickle post go without a shout-out. He knows how much I love him.

I recently got to ask Stew some questions via email about MoonBrine Pickles and here’s what he had to say — sometimes abbreviated…

Can you give me a short/sweet explanation of your process. Fermented and then vinegar added?

MoonBrine Pickles are 100% fermented (lacto-fermented). The cucumbers/vegetables start in a pail of brine, consisting of water, salt and a small amount of (gluten free) distilled vinegar. The pails sit at room temperature for a couple weeks until the vegetables are fully fermented. The pickles are then packed and refrigerated in quarts for retail and pail for restaurants.

You have a pickle tasting room/space?

I do have a little shop. I roll my pickle bar out of my kitchen and sell right there in the basement of the Ford Building at 2505 SE 11th Ave. in Portland. People seem really into discovering it. I call it the MoonBrine Shop N’ Snacketeria.

There you’ll find quart glass jars of our fermented MoonBrine Super Dill, Pretty Hot All Natural Pickles, MoonBrine Sour Mash (Relish) and our MoonBrine Brine, a magical product all on its own. Rotating offerings of deliciousness also include half-sour cucumber pickles, pickled green tomatoes, pickled cauliflower, pickled carrots, pickled cabbage and whatever else comes off the farm and lands in the brine.

MoonBrine Snacketeria hours: Monday – Thursday 11am-3:30pm. Off-hours by appointment if you email email Stew at info@MoonBrine.com.

Where can folks purchase MoonBrine Pickles? Can you give me a price list of various types if bought direct?

Currently, in Portland the pickles are available at the shop – all quarts are $5.
Folks can also buy the pickles at KnowThyFood.com which is a food buying club in town. Ford Food & Drink and Detour Cafe use the pickles on some of their plates and in their Bloody Marys. More stores and restaurants are on the horizon and there are five stores and two restaurants in Boston currently carrying the pickles.

MoonBrine Pickles
www.moonbrine.com

Further evidence of my pickle obsession -- me and friends at Kenny & Zuke's Pickle Throwdown earlier this summer.

Linda Chaplik’s Oh, Goodness! Brownies

February 15th, 2011

Linda Chaplik stopped by recently with some of her peppermint chocolate gluten-free brownies for me. I'm spoiled.

I’m sorry for the silent treatment the past couple weeks. We’ve been through some hard times with our family and I couldn’t think about this, or anything beyond that, for a spell. I’m back now and here’s to good times ahead. This is a post I put together awhile back. It’s still very much pre-expiration date though. Nothing stinky…

I wrote about the Food Innovation Center’s Time to Market Showcase several weeks ago for Willamette Week and then followed that up with a Willamette Week blog post about the event. Now I’m following up my follow-up with even more here about participant Linda Chaplik’s super tasty gluten-free brownies.

Linda is a former corporate training manager turned food entrepreneur here in Portland and her gluten-free brownies (for the record, I have no problem whatsoever with gluten) are fantastic. In upcoming weeks Linda is working on securing a commercial kitchen and getting cafe accounts so keep your eyes peeled for her Oh, Goodness! brownies. I’ll keep you posted here.

Linda's gluten-free brownies are freakishly good. If you see them for sale somewhere buy them. All.

Linda Chaplik and her friend Peggy Flynn at the Food Innovation Center's Time to Market Showcase in December.

Where Fine Books Are Sold

August 18th, 2010

Some people still buy books...

Now that my book has been out for more than a month I figure it’s about time I post a list of spots where you can actually buy it. It’s available in many more places locally and nationally than I’ve included below because most bookstores and a lot of shops go through book distributors and I don’t have that info.

What I do have is a list of spots that Sasquatch Books has sold directly to as of this week and it’s pretty impressive. So, if you don’t have a copy of the book or want to get one for someone here are some of the places in Portland and beyond that you can do that.

P.S. If you want to purchase copies for retail please call Sasquatch Books at 800.775.0817.

In Portland:

Powell’s Books
New Seasons Market
In Good Taste
AAA Travel Store Downtown Portland
Coscto
Barnes & Noble
Ink & Peat
Annie Bloom’s Books
Broadway Books
Urban Farm Store
McMenamins’ Edgefield
Elephants Delicatessen
Presents of Mind
Butterscotch
Stella’s on 21st
Martinotti’s Cafe & Deli
Portland State Bookstore

Beyond:

Third Street Books (McMinnville)
Omnivore Books on Food (San Francisco)
Queen Anne Books (Seattle)
University Bookstore ( UW Seattle)
Waucoma Bookstore (Hood River)
Pear Delicatessen & Shoppe (Seattle)
Elliott Bay Book Company (Seattle)
Ketchum Kitchens (Ketchum, Idaho)

White Pine Products: Kinda Nutty

January 6th, 2010
Maple spice hazelnut, brussels sprout and bacon spaghetti loaded with freshly grated parmesan and a good squeeze of lime juice.

Maple spice hazelnut, brussels sprout and bacon spaghetti loaded with freshly grated parmesan and a good squeeze of lime juice.

A couple years ago I wrote a story about locally grown horseradish (wasabi grows in the Pacific Northwest too by the way) and for that I interviewed the Krizos in the Klamath Basin. It was a really interesting story to research and then I didn’t talk with the Krizos for a couple years.

A few weeks ago I got to see the working cover design for my book Food Lover’s Guide to Portland. I love it and I should because I took all of the cover photos except one — the one of the Krizos’ harvest truck.

So I got to check in with them about this agricultural shot of their truck filled to the brim with horseradish. They gave the green light and that opened up the dialogue. A couple weeks later I heard from their son — Ira Krizo — who lives in town and runs a thriving local, wholesale food business — White Pine Products. Ira provided the recipe to go with that seasonal horseradish story in 2007 — horseradish crusted filet mignon with a blue cheese cream sauce.

In 2007 Ira’s all-natural (some organic) White Pine Products — granolas, candied nuts, pancake mixes, and more — were only in a few stores. Since then WPP has grown and diversified. You can now find White Pine Products in local Whole Foods Markets, Market of Choice stores, and other food and drink shops around town.

The past few weeks I’ve been lucky enough to sample several White Pine Products and here are a few of the tasty treats I’ve enjoyed as a result…

Caramalized onion, feta, white wine and spinach spaghetti topped with candied pecans.

Caramalized onion, feta, white wine and spinach spaghetti topped with candied pecans.

Butter lettuce, bacon, egg, and maple spice hazelnut salad with a miso lime vinaigrette.

Butter lettuce, bacon, egg, and maple spice hazelnut salad with a miso lime vinaigrette.

As you can see from the photo below there’s a lot more to White Pine Products than spiced nuts (Although WPP’s are so fresh and perfectly spiced they takes spiced nuts to a whole new level.) I’ll let you know how the pancake mixes, granola and muesli are next time…

White Pine Products line-up.

White Pine Products line-up.

White Pine Products
503.794.4083
www.whitepine.us
WPP online store